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ESL Easy Quiz

How Much? - Quantity Words and Terms

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about the “How Much Quiz” but your teacher might classify this as "Quantity Words and Terms" If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

"How much" is usually to do with numbers, or quantities. You will find that you often have to use words and terms that involve quantities. In this quiz we will practise some everyday expressions of quantity, and also revise the plural forms of some useful nouns.

  1. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    My boyfriend bought me this wonderful ...
    We have a particular word for such a group (of roses, for instance); it can also be used for bananas (while they are still joined), and even to refer to people in an informal way.
    Meanwhile be careful with the other word here: 'flour' and 'flower' are both quite everyday words which sound very alike, but 'flour' is the white powder that bakers use when making bread!
  2. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    It's so hot today; don't forget to put a ... .... of water in the bowl for the cat.
    As you may have discovered, English is well-known for its 'understatement' ... in other words, we may use a small expression when we really mean rather more. One cat isn't likely to drink a whole litre of water in one day, even in very hot weather. The right answer here may surprise you ... but it may tell you something about how the English mind works!
  3. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    There have recently been a ... .... of news reports about this problem.
    One of these answers is 'stronger' than all the others: it needs to express the idea that there have been several reports, like 'dots along a line' that you can join up and pick out a bigger story.
  4. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    While we're in town, I shall need to buy a new ...
    Most of us have two feet, so the shops sell matching laces with two in the packet. We use the same word for 'two of' most other things (clothing, such as gloves ... but also glasses and trousers, which are thought-of as singular in many other languages), and 'couples' of animals such as birds in your garden.
  5. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    In the 1950s there was a famous song that children liked to sing (especially if they wanted their parents to buy them a pet!).
    It began like this:
    ... is that doggie in the window, the one with the waggly tail?
    (Of course, it helps if you can hear the song in your head, and the rhythm of it ... perhaps you have come across a version of it in your own language?)
    This shouldn't be difficult if you look again at the title of the Quiz!
  6. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    There are plenty of good footballers in the village, but somehow they don't work very successfully as a ...
    There is one particular word we use for a 'side' of sports-players: it's also used a lot in the world of work, to suggest a group of people on a similar job (who are supposed to be sharing responsibility, and doing what they do in similar ways, etc.)
  7. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    When I was young there used to be a ... ... of houses along that side of the street.
    If you come from outside Britain, you may find it rather funny that when people here arrive and wait for something, they 'stand in line' (as the Americans call it), in a queue. You need a similar word in this question, as the sense is the same: 'an orderly, straight line'.
  8. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    'I'd like two ... .... of potatoes, please!'
    Like in other countries, we measure most foodstuffs by weight, rather than by volume or length. We still use the same units as we have done for centuries. If in doubt, you could opt for Answer 2 here which might also suggest 'pounds sterling' (£), but you may know the same idea of 'pound' in your own language (Pfund / livre) to represent 500g. (The actual value should be 454g, so 500 is in fact about 10% too much!)
  9. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    Traditionally in Britain, eggs are sold in ...
    We have a very common way of referring to 'six' of something. Meanwhile be careful of how we form the plural of words like 'box' (and, indeed, 'six').
  10. Choose the word (or words) that make best sense to fill in the gap.
    In the British countryside you can usually tell when it's going to start raining, if you see a ... ... of cows all lying down on the grass.
    English has various special, traditional words to indicate groups of common animals. You may not need to know all of these (though some of them are fascinating), but common ones for farm animals are useful to know.

Author: Ian Miles

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