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ESL Easy Quiz

What Have You Got? - 'Having' and 'Getting'

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and serious at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about “What Have You Got?” but no doubt your teachers will talk about the “’Having’ and ‘Getting’ quiz”! If you hear a specific term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

'Have' and 'get' are two of the most common words in English; sometimes 'get' means the same as 'have', and sometimes it doesn't. Let's help you to pull 'having' and 'getting' apart. It's worth the effort... As we say, 'What have you got to lose?'

  1. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    ' ... ... five minutes to come and help me with this problem, please?'
    The usual way to ask if someone has something, is to say 'Have you got ... ?'.
  2. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'These are lovely fresh bananas, but ... ... any oranges today?'
    This one works much the same way as Question 1.
  3. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    The cheaper model of this machine ... ... so many controls.
    This is how we make the negative version.
    We do not use the word 'get' in the negative EXCEPT if there is a sense of:
    receiving something ('You're not getting any more sweets unless you calm down')
    OR when the 'get' means
    ... 'become' ('This work doesn't get any easier, even after some time and effort.)
    ... OR 'arrive' ('Our plane doesn't get to Moscow until ten-thirty.')
  4. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'The shopping ... ... any cheaper as the months and years go by.'
    This is an example of 'get' meaning 'become'.
    We use the continuous form here, because the rising prices have been going on for a long time and they are still going up.
  5. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'You ... ... anywhere with an international phone call unless you start by dialing 00-'
    Answer 3 is best ('You won't make any progress ...'); Answer 2 is the longer form, but it's not what people would say in conversation.
  6. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'Don't turn left until you ... ... to the corner with the pub on it.'
    We might also say 'until you have got to' ('got to' = 'reached as far as'); but the present-tense form is fine.
  7. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'I'm afraid I can't come and see you tomorrow morning, as we planned, because ... ... nasty cough and ... ... appointment at the doctors' clinic at 10:45.'
    Answers 1 and 4 may look good, but we need to say 'AN' appointment, so neither of those does it right.
    Answer 3 is possible, but less natural than the (correct) Answer 2. 'I've got an appointment' also, somehow, carries the sense that 'I've got to go to it' ( = I am obliged; I have to attend ) ... which is why you can't now meet your friend at the original time.
  8. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    If a regular polygon ... ... six sides, what angle ... ... inside each corner?
    In a formal situation like a maths question (certainly in writing), we don't use 'get' or 'got'.
    Answer 1 is a possible version, but it seems rather dry and old-fashioned.
    Remember the (language!) formula : ' How many/much ... does it have?' (e.g. 'How many doors does your car have?')
    Just in case you were wondering, the shape here is a hexagon. What do you call it in your language? It is a fairly international word, we believe: so much so, that the French sometimes call their country 'l'Hexagone', because it looks quite similar.
  9. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    'On television in your home country, do you ... ... any of our classic British detective dramas like Morse and Lewis?'
    Answer 2 is also possible, but the 'get' is more usual here, because:
    We want to know whether you 'get' the programme, i.e. if it's possible for your equipment to receive it so that you can watch.
    There is also the idea that your national broadcasters at home (the TV companies) are 'getting' (i.e. buying or renting) the programmes to show to you there. If they are doing this, it helps spread British culture and it also brings more money into the UK. And it means you can watch the shows at home, and practise your English, and be reminded of British places and habits and lifestyle!
    (Meanwhile, please be sure that we do NOT go around murdering each other every week, any more than in any other country!)
  10. Fill the gap with the word (or words) that make the most accurate and natural expression in spoken British English.
    ' ... ... anyone else ... ... to Question 10 yet? ... ... you ... ... all the right answers?'
    This is asking 'Have you reached Q.10, and does anyone have the answers?' : two of the major uses of 'got'.
    'Does anyone have ... ?' in the second part of Answer 4 is also good.

Author: Ian Miles

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