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Everyone Knows! - Correlatives

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about “Everyone Knows!” but no doubt your teachers will talk about the “Correlatives quiz”! If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

Everyone knows focuses on correlatives, the group of words including 'somewhere', 'nobody' and others.

Everyone knows how to ask questions... does anyone have the answer? Beware of 'inventing' words into this group that never actually exist (such as 'no-who' and 'anywhen')... Take a look at this quiz to learn more about correlatives.

  1. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    'I certainly saw ... ... standing under the tree, but really, it could have been ... ... .'
    Answer 1 is the only one that makes sense in both places.
  2. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    ' ... ... feels a bit sorry for themselves ... ... .'
    Again, this is the only Answer whose elements both exist, and fit the sense.
  3. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    'Let's not try taking that very small road; it probably doesn't lead ... ... , ... ... .'
    Remember the negative 'not ... any ...' (In this case, 'it does not lead anywhere').
    'Anyhow' = 'in any case; whatever anyone may think or hope'.
  4. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    ' ... ... is ... ... simple in the world of international bureaucracy.'
    'Nothing / nobody EVER is ...'
    English does NOT need a 'double negative' ('He never said nothing'; although in certain places you may hear this usage.)
  5. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    From the General Thanksgiving (a slightly modernised form of a classic 17th-century English church prayer):
    'We should ... ... and ... ... give thanks and praise to Almighty God (...) '
    These are the '100%' terms for time and place.
  6. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    'Why hasn't ... ... managed to do ... ... about the broken window since last week?'
    'Why didn't anyone ... ?'
    Answer 3, with its double 'open' elements ('didn't ANYone do ANYthing?') is also possible.
    As with an earlier question, Answer 4 may be heard (sometimes!) but it should not be regarded as standard English.
  7. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    'This stupid discussion is getting us ... ...'
    This is a useful English phrase if a lot of words have been said without achieving any progress.
  8. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    Advice to children: ' ... ... go ... ... with an adult that you don't know and trust.'
    If the negative element is already on the front of the sentence ('Never ...'), any other related element will be 'open' (' ... any ... '): 'There's never any peace and quiet in this house at the weekend'.
    In Answer 2, the 'Don't ... ' start is a good way to open a negative instruction, but it does not then need another negative element later, so this would be wrong (although yet again, you may hear certain kinds of speaker using this sort of structure).
  9. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    ... ... well-planned public event, such as a concert or exhibition, should try to include ... ... for ... ... .
    Read this through carefully and you will find it makes much the clearest sense.
  10. Choose the best word/s to fill the gap in good clear, accurate English.
    The famous actor, playwright and musician Noel Coward wrote a wonderful song called 'London Pride', to help cheer up the spirits of people in the city during the darkest times of World War 2 (with the bombs, etc.).
    One of the verses ends with the lines:
    ' ... ... could quite replace the grace of London town.'
    We see this phrase in other situations such as 'Nothing ever happens in this village' or 'Nothing ever seems to go right on Friday 13th'. It is another example of a negative followed by an open element ('No ... ever ...', similar to 'Nobody [ever!] has any change' ).
    Well, London is still there after all these years ... and we hope everyone has scored all the points they can on this Quiz about its language!

Author: Ian Miles

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