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Moving On - Phrasel Verbs

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about “Moving On?” but no doubt your teachers will talk about the “Phrasel Verbs quiz”! If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

This Quiz is based on Phrasal Verbs, and should soon have you 'moving on’ in your use of English ways of asking permission.

Anyway… Moving on!

  1. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    'If you are ... ... a good quality used car, you will be ... ... paying over £10,000.'
    We 'look for' a thing when we are actively searching; we may 'look at' it once we have found it. We use 'looking at' in the sense that someone is facing a challenge or difficulty, like an expensive price or a long stay in prison ('If you shoot a police officer, you would be looking at a long time in jail.')
  2. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    Once we have ... ... the new cupboard in the bathroom, we can ... ... all those old medicines again.
    All the 'put' expressions here exist in English ~ you might find it interesting to check them ~ but only the pair at Answer 3 makes full sense.
  3. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    When preparing most kinds of fruit or vegetables, we ... ... the outside part and ... ... the inside part.
    Answer 2 is best here, though Answer 1 might describe an even earlier stage (cutting the skin of the fruit away/off, before cutting out the centre from what remains).
  4. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    When you return the hire car to the airport, the two most important things to remember are:
    ... ... the fuel tank, and ... ... the details on the return form!
    'Fill up ... / ... fill out' is also possible, but usually we 'fill in' a form.
    Many of these other suggested phrases exist and do other jobs in English, except 'fill back' which we don't think has any sensible meaning.
  5. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    She ... ... the car and ... ... the lights.
    In spoken English one 'gets out of' something (this can also mean avoiding responsibility: 'I got out of having to pay'). Apart from the use of 'get', some non-native speakers might feel that we needed a Reflexive element in the phrase ('Get yourself out of that situation' is possible).
    We can meanwhile 'switch off' or 'turn off', or even 'turn out' the lights.
  6. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    A science teacher may well ask her students to ... ... the results of an experiment, and ... ... the whole experiment afterwards as homework.
    We write things down (like to record, on paper and for future reference, a telephone number that someone's just told us) ; we write up an account of something afterwards, like a policeman writing up a report of what has just happened. We may talk about a 'writeup' when we are looking online, in a paper or magazine to see what the critics thought about a show or film that we might be thinking to go and watch for ourselves.
    We can 'write off' in the sense of sending a letter away to ask about something, or register an interest ('I've written off for more details about the holiday'); a badly damaged car will be 'written off', in the sense that is 'beyond economic repair', i.e. it would be unreasonable to pay more to mend it than the vehicle is actually worth.
  7. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    'Having tried it for a little while, I think smoking is a disgusting habit. I'm going to ... ... tobacco, and ... ... the smart lighter that my so-called friend gave me for my last birthday.'
    People might 'give in' by stopping their resistance to something ('I give in; you're going to have to tell me the answer instead of me trying to guess'); and they might 'give things away' (e.g. here, passing on their remaining tobacco to somebody else).
    One product may be 'given away' (free of charge) with something else, e.g. a bar of chocolate with a tankful of car fuel; the bride at a wedding is formally 'given away' by her father or another family member. And we can also 'give away a secret' ('It was a bit of a giveaway that she'd agreed to marry him, when we could see that great big ring on her finger').
    Plenty to think about here!
  8. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    'While we're talking ... ... plans for next week, maybe we could talk ... ... the details for the day our guests arrive.'
    We talk (or speak) 'about' a topic, and may then 'talk through' the details more closely (probably in a logical order, such as the time sequence of what will be happening).
  9. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    Luckily for almost everyone, the heating did not ... ... before the school ... ... for the Christmas holidays.
    A machine may 'break down'; a school or college may 'break up' when its term ends and the people disperse for their holidays. 'Break up' can also mean that something comes apart, like a shipwreck; but clearly it does not carry quite that meaning here!
    A couple (of adult people; or indeed, a family) may 'break up' ( = move apart ) if their relationship breaks down.
  10. Choose the best answer to fill the gap/s and make clear accurate English.
    People in a very early cinema started ... ... , when the film showed them moving images of a train ... ... a station.
    Any of the other Answers would have made some sense, suggesting that the audience were moving back from the screen as fast as they could; but only Answer 1 is right for the second part, 'coming into ... ' a place.

Author: Ian Miles

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