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Up Hill, Down Dale - Landscape & Landmarks

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about “Up Hill, Down Dale?” but no doubt your teachers will talk about the “Landscapes & Landmarks quiz”! If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

The British Isles contain many wonderful landscapes and landmarks, around the coastline and inland; but you may also wish to describe the beauties of your home country for your new English-speaking friends. This quiz will help you develop your 'geographical language' for doing this.

We use the phrase 'up hill, down dale' to mean 'travelling widely in all sorts of landscapes' ~ as we hope you may be, if you are visiting Britain. The Dales is a beautiful landscape and landmark in a very scenic region in the north of England.

  1. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    Two colours that you may notice when you are travelling in wild parts of Britain are the ... ... of heather on moorland (particularly in Scotland) and in the spring, the bright ... ... of gorse bushes on the Downs.
    If you are here in about May, you may also enjoy the 'carpet' of bluebells in the woodlands.
  2. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    The first glimpse of Britain that you may see, if you arrive by boat across the Channel from France, are the ... ...
    The vertical (or near-vertical) face of a hill that has been 'eaten away' by the sea over the ages, are cliffs. The ones in this Question are among the most famous in the world!
  3. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    If you are travelling in the countryside and looking for some small village that may be hard to find, the best way to look for it in the distance is to try and spot the ... ... .
    In these days of 'sat-nav' you may not need such methods, but it is more fun to look at the landscape, and you will soon find you can begin to 'read' it. Almost any community in Britain will have a church near its centre, even if the building may now be closed (or perhaps converted into something else like a private home, studio or arts centre).
  4. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    You can meanwhile explore many of our fine ... ... using the networks of ... ... .
    Please do explore this further if you are interested in discovering some of the most wonderful places in Britain!
  5. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    The Lake District is known for its lakes (obviously enough!) but also for its ...
    English tends to be modest about its mountains and call them 'hills', even though they are big and rocky enough to be called mountains in many parts of the country.
    'Valleys' (Answer 3) seems a little pointless, since the most important feature of most of the valleys (beautiful though these often are) are the Lakes themselves.
  6. It is sad how some villages are gradually 'dying'. One way of reckoning the health of a village is to check how many it still has of the following features:
    The fullest list here is the best, though some people might add other features.
  7. Which of these Answers places these groups of trees in the correct order, from the smallest to the largest?
    Answer 3 is correct here.
  8. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    When you are walking in the British countryside you should keep to ... ... and obey the ... ... .
    Many other countries have similar systems.
    Answer 1 would not give you a particularly 'country' walk (all on roadways), although you might avoid getting much mud on your boots!
  9. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    The place where boats can transfer safely to a higher or lower water level, in a separate section of a river or canal, is called a ... ... ; and if there are several of these one after the other, the whole set is known as a ... ... .
    British engineers were responsible for inventing and developing these on the canal system at the start of the Industrial Revolution.
  10. Choose the answer that best fills the gap/s in sensible, accurate English.
    A number of large old private houses (sometimes known as ' ... ... ' ) are now administered by the ... ... , and open to its members and to the public who come to visit.
    These too are well worth a visit and often full of surprises. You can usually find them with the help of brown road signs.

Author: Ian Miles

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