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Grammar - Conjugating - ER Verbs in the Future Tense (Part 2)

In this Spanish Difficult Review quiz you will continue to learn how to conjugate ER verbs in the future tense. Just as was done in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: Conjugating ER Verbs in the Future Tense! (Part 1), this quiz will continue on with helping you to review and learn how to conjugate verbs in the future tense.

If you believe that you need to review the future tense verb endings, please check out the previous quizzes, as well as the quizzes on AR verbs. There are no new verbs being introduced in this quiz so you should already be familiar with the verbs that will be shown. Again, the verbs will be shown in their base form and in all capitalized letters. Read each quiz sentence carefully and then check to see if you were able to determine the proper ER future tense verb ending. Remember to pay attention to the pronoun associated with the verb.

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  1. I CORRER to the store to get some milk.
    The verb correr means to run. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun 'I' has been provided for you. The first and last answers are not proper verb forms. The second answer reads: he/she/you [singular formal]/it will run. This is not the proper pronoun verb form. The third answer reads: I will run. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: I will run to the store to get some milk.
  2. Kathy LEER the book to the class.
    The verb leer means to read. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. To do that you need to know which pronoun can replace Kathy. That would be she or ella. The second answer reads: you [singular familiar] will read. It is, however, not the correct verb pronoun form. The third answer reads: I will read. That is also not the correct verb pronoun form. The last answer reads: they/you [plural formal] will read. Once again, that is not the correct verb pronoun form. The first answer reads: she will read. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: Kathy will read the book to the class.
  3. You BEBER all of the grape soda. (singular familiar)
    The verb beber means to drink. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun 'you' [singular familiar] has been provided for you. The first and last answers are conditional verb forms you have yet to learn. They are, however, not the proper verb tense. The third answer is an imperfect verb form. That, too, is a verb form you have yet to learn and it is not the proper verb tense needed here. The second answer reads: you [singular familiar] will drink. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: You will drink all of the grape soda.
  4. Jason and Todd CREER almost anything you tell them.
    The verb creer means to believe. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. To do that you need to know which pronoun can replace Jason and Todd. That would be they or ellos. Neither the first, second or third answers are proper verb forms. The last answer reads as: they will believe. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: Jason and Todd will believe almost anything you tell them.
  5. We PROMETER to keep your secret.
    The verb prometer means to promise. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun we has been provided. The first answer is not a verb form. The second answer reads: you [plural familiar] will promise. It is, however, not the proper pronoun verb form. The last answer reads: they/you [plural formal] will promise. It, too, is not the proper pronoun verb form. The third answer reads: we will promise. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: We will promise to keep your secret.
  6. You TRAER the popcorn to the party. (plural familiar)
    The verb traer means to bring. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun 'you' [plural familiar] has been provided. The second answer reads: you [singular familiar] will begin”. That is not the proper pronoun form. The third answer reads: you [singular formal] will bring. It is also not the proper pronoun form. The last answer reads: you [plural formal] will bring. Again, it is not the proper pronoun verb form. The first answer reads: you [plural familiar] will bring. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: You will bring the popcorn to the party.
  7. The judge PREVER who the winner will be.
    The verb prever means to anticipate. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. To do that you need to know which pronoun can replace the judge. That would be he or él. The first and last answers are not verb forms. The third answer is misspelled. The second answer reads: he will anticipate. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: The judge will anticipate who the winner will be.
  8. I LAMER the ice-cream before it melts.
    The verb lamer means to lick. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun 'I' has been provided or you. The first answer reads: they/you [plural formal] will lick. That is not the proper pronoun verb form. The second answer reads: you [singular familiar] will lick. That is not the proper pronoun verb form. The third answer reads: he/she/you [singular formal]/it will lick. That, too, is not the proper pronoun verb form. The last answer reads: I will lick. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: I will lick the ice-cream before it melts.
  9. We TEJER sweaters for Christmas.
    The verb tejer means to knit. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. The pronoun 'we' has been provided. Neither the second, third nor last answers are verb forms. The first answer reads: we will knit. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: We will knit sweaters for Christmas.
  10. The students POSEER the longest record for wins.
    The verb poseer means to possess. Now you need to make it a future tense verb. To do that you need to know which pronoun can replace the students. That would be they or ellos. The first and second answers are not verb forms and are misspellings. The last answer is a past tense verb that reads: they possessed. It is not the proper verb tense. The third answer reads: they will possess. It is the proper pronoun verb form and the given sentence now reads as: The students will possess the longest records for wins.

Author: Christine G. Broome

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