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Language - Spanish Difficult Summary Review

Can you believe it! You are almost done with your Spanish Difficult Review academic quizzes. In fact, there is only one more quiz left after this one, i.e., Language: Completing Spanish Difficult Review. Before we wrap this all up, however, in this Spanish Difficult Review quiz we will do a summary review of all that you have learned throughout the entire three Review quiz series.

If you have taken each of the three Spanish levels of quizzes, i.e., Spanish Easy Review, Spanish medium Review and Spanish Difficult Review, then you know that you have learned quite a lot about the Spanish language, including Spanish grammar, sentence structure, verb conjugation, reading comprehension, word association (feminine/masculine) and, really, just about everything you need to know to be able to read and write in Spanish.

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Of course, there are more things to learn for those who wish to go even further and for those who have the desire to be able to speak fluently in Spanish. To get to that point you will need to take a conversational Spanish course where you will practice actually speaking the language with others. You might even want to check out the Spanish Lessons series that this site has to offer you for a more in-depth learning experience.

In the Spanish Lessons series (there are ten levels with 100 lessons in each level), everything that has been presented in these quizzes will be covered but each step will be broken down into baby-steps. You will be able to get a lot more practice in smaller bite portions and you can do the lessons at your own pace. The Spanish Lessons will help you to learn how to think in Spanish and, as has been stated in several quiz introductions, if you want to be able to fluently speak in any language, you MUST be able to think in that language. But that is getting ahead of ourselves. First, you need to complete the Spanish Difficult Review academic quizzes.

This Summary Review quiz will run exactly as it did in both the Spanish Easy Review and the Spanish Medium review quiz series. In other words, this quiz is all about testing your memory of the facts and rules of Spanish. In order to retain what you have learned about Spanish words, you need to retain the rules behind those words. So, let’s see what you remember!

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  1. This is an adverb that indicates that something has more (más) or less (menos) of a quantity or quality.
    When an adverb indicates that something has more (más) or less (menos) of a quantity or quality (ex: She is more excited than her sister. – or – She is less excited than her sister.) it is known as a comparative adverb. (Information can be found in the Spanish Medium Review quiz titled Grammar: Comparative Adverbs.)
  2. How does a superlative adverb differ from a comparative adverb?
    The comparative adverb describes something as being more (más) or less (menos). In English this would be the same as adding letters of 'er' to a word such as big becomes bigger. A superlative adverb refers to something as being the most and in English that would be like adding the letters of 'est' to the word making big become biggest. To show that something is the most, the definite article (el/la) is placed before either más or menos. (Information can be found in the Challenging Spanish quiz titled Grammar: Superlative Adverbs.)
  3. Which of the following numbers is correctly written in Spanish?
    According to the rules in Spanish when it comes to numbers, they do the opposite of what we do in English. In English, beginning with a thousand and upwards, we use a comma after every three digits, counting backwards from the right to the left, i.e., 2,000,000. The comma is NOT used in Spanish to designate this but, rather, a period is used to the same number in Spanish would be read as, 2.000.000. In addition, where a decimal point would be used in Spanish such as in money to show cents or in a number that will show a percentage, rather than a period being used a decimal point is used. The first answer above shows the number in its English form so you now need to look at the opposite punctuation marks of that number. The second answer shows the period in the place of the comma and the comma in place of the period. (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Math: Punctuation Marks with Numbers.)
  4. What is a complex preposition in Spanish?
    In Spanish, a complex preposition is when two or more words are combined together to show a function. For example, in English we would say: He sat beside her. In Spanish this would read as: Él se sentó al lado de ella. It takes three word in Spanish (al lado de) to say the one word used in English. Because it takes more than one word – it is a complex preposition. (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: Complex Prepositions.)
  5. What is the Spanish name for two different words that mean the same or nearly the same thing?
    The Spanish name for two different words that mean the same or nearly the same thing is sinónimo (synonym in English). (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: The Parts of Language!.)
  6. What is the Spanish word for words that are used to imitate a sound or idea?
    The Spanish word for words that are used to imitate a sound or idea is onomatopeya (onomatopoeia in English). (Information can be found in the quiz titled Grammar: The Parts of Language!.)
  7. How do you show the negative in Spanish?
    To show the negative in Spanish you simply add the word no and it is placed before the verb. (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: Working with the Negatives.)
  8. In Spanish, 'ing' verbs are known as what kind of verb?
    In Spanish, 'ing' verbs are known as progressive verbs. (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: Using 'ing' With Spanish Verbs.)
  9. Aplaudirán is what kind of a verb?
    Aplaudirán is a future tense verb. It contains the base form of the verb (aplaudir) and adds on the future tense ending. It reads as: they applauded. (Information can be found in the Spanish Difficult Review quiz titled Grammar: Conjugating IR Verbs in the Future Tense (Part 2).)
  10. Before you can become fluent in Spanish you MUST be able to do this?
    Although each of the answers given are or can be part of the process of learning how to speak Spanish, to become fluent in Spanish you MUST be able to think in Spanish. (Information can be found in the introduction section of many quizzes.)

Author: Christine G. Broome

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